Letter To A Diabetic

Or I Understand What You're Going Through

A Normal Life…

I recently read an article in which a Diabetic recalled being told at the time he was diagnosed that he would be able to “live a normal life.”

A normal life…

I do normal things. I go to work five days each week. I take showers and crochet. I walk my dogs. I chat with my sister on Facebook. But other than diabetes management being something that I have to do every day, it is not normal. Normal isn’t always normal just because it becomes regular or comfortable or predictable. There is nothing “normal” about a diabetic life. It will never feel normal to go to bed each night knowing that your blood glucose could dump in your sleep, send you into a diabetic coma, and never let you wake again. There is nothing normal about having to bleed, inject, log, and measure every day. But we all do it. There is nothing normal about having to run home on a break to inject a new sensor for the week or having to set aside 10-15% of my income to cover the cost of diabetes copays.

So, let’s stop trying to lead normal lives. Let’s embrace the difference. Let’s allow everyone to see how incredibly amazing we all are just for being able to not die from this disease every day. We are Diabetics. We are not normal. We are unbelievably strong. We can complete complicated mathematical formulas in seconds just to eat a meal. We are all endocrinologists, dietitians, counselors, and diabetes experts. We know how to adjust dosages, how to recognize and treat hypo- and hyperglycemia, and how to pick ourselves up off our rear-ends and run back out into the world without anyone even noticing that we nearly just died because our blood sugar dropped 100 points in 20 minutes and we were dizzy and swaying and so close to passing out that we considered in those moments the frailty of our existence.

We are not normal. We are the epitome of amazing.

Love and light.

Crack out the Crock Pot

I love crock pot soups and I had a hankering for cream of celery. A little google search brought me right here to WordPress, where I found this recipe. I modified it a little bit (just for personal preference) and it turns out great!

Follow the link above for the original by Chika Obih Wellness or use the tweaked version I did. Either way, you can’t go wrong.

My version:

Ingredients:

1 medium onion

3.5 C chopped celery

1/2 C chopped carrot

2 t salt

1 t pepper

2 C water

2 C vanilla soymilk

1-2 serrano peppers chopped

3 T butter or butter substitute

Instructions:

Put all ingredients in a crock pot large enough to hold everything and cook on high for 3-4 hours. As the ingredients cook, the stock will begin to cover the top of the veggies. When you first start it, it will look like there isn’t enough liquid for the soup.

Once cooked, use a hand blender to blend soup into a smooth consistency.

 

That’s it! It’s comes out pretty hot with 2 peppers. 1 would probably be enough but go by your tastes.

 

 

Diabetes is a Unique Disease

I found this video on the differences in diabetes from person to person. Worth a watch. Our disease is unique to each of us. We can’t all be lumped into the category of diabetics and treated the same for management.

 

 

And Now It’s Time For A Diabetic Laugh…

I found this on facebook and had to share it here for those of you who have not seen it. I think jokes about diabetes are funny as long as the person telling them actually understands diabetes. Clearly this person gets it.

Copied from this website.

 

29 Things Only a Person with Diabetes Would Understand

Written by Lizmari Collazo

1. Every paper cut is an opportunity to test your blood sugar.

image

2. You have an entire drawer, dresser, or closet devoted to diabetes supplies.

image

3. You have hundreds of lancets and only a few test strips. But on the plus side, your health insurance company is willing to pay for more lancets!

image

4. When it’s time to test, all you have to do is squeeze your finger.

image

5. The phrase “once in a blue moon” is a reminder that it’s time to change your lancet.

image

6. You hesitate to wear white in case you prick your finger and hit a ‘gusher.’

image

7. Your fingers appear to spell something in braille.

image

8. Being high means something completely different to you than it does to most people.

image

9. You can calculate the carbohydrate total of every meal in your head without breaking a sweat.

image

10. You should test your blood sugar six times a day, but insurance only approved you for one strip a week.

image

11. You can put a mathematician to shame: insulin on board, carb factors, insulin to carb ratio, no problem!

image

12. Well-meaning friends have offered you every diabetes remedy under the sun, from cinnamon to birdseed milk.

image

13. You’ve heard, “But you don’t look like a diabetic!”

image

14. You’re familiar with all the diabetes horror stories of the relatives of anyone you’ve ever met.

image

15. You’ve heard, “You can’t eat that!” too many times.

image

16. Everyone wants to know where you got your cool pager.

image

17. You find used test strips in your refrigerator but don’t know how they got there.

image

18. You have a pile of diabetes cookbooks holding up your sofa.

image

19. You own 15 glucose meters, but you only use one.

image

20. CSI would have a very hard time ‘investigating the scene’ at your house.

image

21. You have two cases of juice boxes at home, and none of them are for your kids.

image

22. You have to remind yourself that it isn’t polite to punch people who say ‘diabeetus’ in the face.

image

23. The pharmacy is number one on your speed dial, and you’re on a first name basis with the pharmacist.

image

24. People often say “You can eat it, it’s sugar free!” about something that’s loaded with carbohydrates.

image

25. Everyone asks you what to do about their ‘noncompliant’ diabetic spouse.

image

26. You read every article that promises ways to improve your glucose level, but they all end up being about prevention instead.

image

27. According to TV commercials, it’s a good thing you’re young, because only old people get diabetes.

image

28. There’s never been any butter in your refrigerator’s butter compartment — it’s used for storing insulin.

image

29. To lick or to wipe? That is the question.

image

“If You Meet Someone With Type 1 Diabetes, This Is What You Should Know” by Justine Nancarrow

A friend shared this article and I think it is well worth sharing here. 

 

Happy Diagnostiversary!

Today is the third anniversary of my diabetes diagnosis. Every year I celebrate being alive and, so far, without any major complications. It’s a big deal, this diagnostiversary. It’s one more year of seeing, one more year free of kidney damage, one more year of avoiding neuropathy. One more year that diabetes didn’t get me. One more year of life. I’m grateful for every day that I can get up, play with my pups, and go through the day with a comfy sofa and wagging tails to go home to. Life is a wonderful thing, and I love mine, diabetes and all. I wouldn’t ask for a different one if I could.

 

Quinoa Chickpea & Avocado Summer Salad

msteck:

Quinoa is a fantastic complete protein. It goes with everything and this recipe looks particularly delicious! Curious about quinoa? Check out some info here.

Originally posted on The Recipe to Life :

Hey everyone! I know it’s been quite a while since I’ve written anything. A natural disaster hit close to home, and I’ve been helping facilitate donations and assistance for families in need, and have not had any time for anything else for quite a while. BUT, on a happier note, things are starting to get organized enough to where I’m able to have some personal time again, and do the things I need to do. Well, ok, not that blogging is something I NEED to do, but I sure do enjoy it. It’s one of those healthy release things I think. So here I am, and I’d like to share a fantastic recipe I’ve found with you. I made it this week and it is wonderful. We had unseasonably warm temperatures in our area this week (Seattle area, try almost 90 at the beginning of May! Holy smokes!), and it…

View original 328 more words

Misdiagnosed

I found this story on the Greater Good website and it’s worth reading. I was originally misdiagnosed (or rather, not even diagnosed). In February of 2011, I went to see an Endocrinologist. I had never been to one but I thought it would help since I believed that the trouble I was having was related to hypothyroidism and I was concerned that my primary physician wasn’t catching some stuff that a specialist would. I was constantly fatigued, depressed, thirsty, had to pee all the time. Right.

So I get to the this doc, whose name I’ll not mention, and this old bloke tells me that he has “seen this before” and what I really needed was to go out and get a career and a husband. Um, can we say jacka**?! He then told me in a condescending sort of way that he would pursue this with me if I wanted. I went home, frustrated, exhausted, and having to pee…again.

August 11th, 2011 I was in the ER. Diabetes. Diagnosed T2 only to realize later it was actually T1 (LADA). So, I know this happens and it probably happens more than we hear about since I suspect there are some serious malpractice implications that go along with these stories. But, whether caught early or late, here we all are, and here’s “Thirteen Years and Counting.

 

CGM (Continuous Glucose Monitor)

After having too many low readings (30s – 50s) with no symptoms until feeling like I was going to pass out, I caved and got the Dexcom G4 continuous glucose monitor. I wish I would have gotten this thing earlier. It’s an awesome device. It spits out a bgl reading every five minutes. It’s user friendly, easy to insert, very small, and gives information on trending. Alarms can be set for highs and lows and I have been told there is an android app that allows users to get info off the monitor from great distances (think kids at school and such) though I haven’t verified this. It is tubeless, and comes in pink, blue, and black. Seriously folks, any T1 who has trouble keeping their bg where they want it should have one of these. Check out the Dexcom page about the CGM.

I have been in bed sick this week and normally in this situation keeping my bg in range is a futile endeavor but I have mostly been able to keep it in the 100s because I have known exactly what it is and where it is going. The information you get on trending with this monitor is invaluable. So take a look, and if you already have a CGM, share your thoughts on which devices and features you prefer.

 

Insulin Pen Approved for Diabetic Dogs

Well looky what I found! A new insulin pen has been approved for use with diabetic dogs. Check the caveat at the bottom – dogs allergic to pork products should NOT use this.

I scanned this straight out of the most current issue of Dog Fancy magazine.

dog insulin pen

Dorian's Hand

I'm just a little baby touching the world...

Life on the Farmlet

My continuing adventures in North Alabama!

pickupmypancreas

My pancreas and I don't see eye-to-eye on anything...

theperfectd™

There is no such thing, but we keep trying...with Type 1 Diabetes

Andyo1976's Blog

Just my stuff, how it is.

t1dme

Reflections of an unpolished pebble ~ a type 1 diabetes blog

Pretty Little Treasures

Don't be afraid to dream big!

Blue Cupcake Press

Handmade greetings for people with diabetes

Bunny Kitchen

Exploring the possibilities of cruelty free food

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 484 other followers

%d bloggers like this: